On This Day in Trinity House History – 24 May

1665

The Elder Brethren decide on a better class of tipple 

Trinity House Court Minute:

“The Court finding that sometimes the Claret provided for the meeting did not prove so good as was expected, the Wardens were desired to provide a tierce or two of such Claret as might be approved of.”

It is worth noting that on no account is red wine allowed in the Court Room today, for fear of soling the second largest single-loom rug in the nation! (The largest being in Windsor Castle)

Cook’s Corner, April 1958 – Piccalilli

Continuing the theme of presenting recipes for lighthouse keepers and lightsmen from archive editions of our in-house journal Flash, the following is a recipe for piccalilli from the April 1958 edition. Bon appétit!

COOK’S CORNER by Sarah Jane
PICCALILLI
Ingredients:
6 lbs. vegetables in all, onions, cauliflower, green tomatoes, marrow, cucumber.
3½ ozs. Mustard.
4 ozs. Loaf Sugar.
2 Tablespoons Flour.
1 oz. Turmeric.
3 Pints Vinegar.
    
Cut up vegetables, spread on dish, sprinkle with salt (1 desertspoon ) and leave all night.
Place vegetables with sugar and 2½ pints vinegar in saucepan and boil for ¼ hour.
Mix Turmeric, Mustard and Flour, with remaining ½ pint of Vinegar, pour into saucepan over vegetables and boil for 3 minutes, stirring continually.
Put into warm jars whilst hot.

(In)To The Lighthouse

We recently received the following email through our enquiries@thls.org helpdesk, and we thought it was such a good question that we ought to post the response for all to see on this blog:

“Please would it be possible to publish some interior photos of the rock lighthouses on your website.  It would be very interesting to see what the interiors are/were like, particularly as these will never be seen by the general public and it helps to imagine the way the keepers lived.  For all of us who have an interest in lighthouses and their history it would be marvellous to be able to see some photos.”

We hope the following images taken from the Trinity House archives will be of interest to all!

Bishop Rock Lighthouse bunk beds

Bishop Rock Lighthouse bunk beds

Bishop Rock Lighthouse service room in 1980

Bishop Rock Lighthouse service room in 1980

Bishop Rock Lighthouse kitchen in 1975

Bishop Rock Lighthouse kitchen in 1975

Longstone Lighthouse living room as it was rebuilt in 1951

Longstone Lighthouse living room as it was rebuilt in 1951

Longstone Lighthouse keepers' dwellings bedroom furniture

Longstone Lighthouse keepers’ dwellings bedroom furniture

Of course, the lighthouses of Trinity House are now unmanned, and are typically uninhabited, except for visits by our technicians and engineers. Here is an example of a room—albeit a particularly and untypically bright one!—left uninhabited for many years:

Bardsey Lighthouse keepers' cottages as they are after years of disuse

Bardsey Lighthouse keepers’ cottages as they are after years of disuse

Finally, a beautiful view from the inside of the Eddystone Lighthouse, looking out to sea:

View from Eddystone Lighthouse stairs

View from Eddystone Lighthouse stairs

Cook’s Corner, July 1958

Feeling peckish? We proudly present this very simple recipe for Sussex Pudding taken from the July 1958 edition of Trinity House’s in-house journal Flash, written as part of a series of recipes intended for the men serving on the lighthouses, lightvessels and tenders.

Tea time at Beachy Head Lighthouse, circa 1955

Tea time at Beachy Head Lighthouse, circa 1955

COOK’S CORNER by Sarah Jane

My recipe this quarter is for Sussex Pudding.

SUSSEX PUDDING
Ingredients:
6 ozs. Suet
6 ozs. Flour (Self Raising)
6 ozs. Raisins
¼ Pint Milk

Rub the suet into the flour, mix in the raisins and stir in the milk till the whole is mixed.
Grease a tin 8″ long, 6½” wide, 2″ deep, and put the pudding mixture in, keeping the top fairly level.
Bake for about 1 hour in a hot oven.

Keeping up the gastronomic theme, the Editor of the time saw fit to follow up with the following poem, drafted with tongue firmly in cheek by a member of the Pilot Service:

“OH MY ACHlNG TUM”
Oh Mr. Tailor please note well
When next you come to measure
The Pilot Service personnel
You’ll not get so much leisure.

For in the past you may recall
We were mostly rather slim
At least some were, if not quite all
Let’s say just nice and trim.

Don’t get me wrong and think that we
Are living fast and loose
But now we’re fed by Trinity
On chicken, duck and goose.

So throwaway our last years charts
And bring a tape much bigger
That will navigate our middle parts
And record our new found figure.

Mr. P C Clarke