On This Day in Trinity House History – 20 July

1685

John Evelyn records his time at Trinity Monday

John Evelyn’s diary entry reads:

“The Trinity-Company met this day, which should have been on the Monday after Trinity, but was put off by reason of the Royal Charter being so large, that it could not be ready before. Some immunities were superadded. Mr. Pepys, Secretary to the Admiralty, was a second time chosen Master. We went to church, according to custom, and then took barge to the Trinity-House, in London, where we had a great dinner, above eighty at one table.”

 


1745

Early problems with the Nore Lightvessel

Trinity House Board Minute:

Nore Lightvessel model

Nore Lightvessel model

“Mr. Cam, one of the lessees of the light at the Nore attended to answer Captain Hallum’s complaint against the light and admitted that there happened an accidental obstruction in one of the funnels just at the time complained of, but said that it was removed in about half an hour, after which there was a good light, as there hath been all along, without any former complaint of this nature and he promised that all possible care should be taken to keep a good light for the future, offering to remove the present lightkeeper and put in anyone whom the Corporation should name,

Which being considered and that Captain Hallum admits in his complaint that one of the lamps was kindled as he came by, Mr. Cam was charged to take especial care that a good light be constantly maintained hereafter, to be kindled every evening immediately after sunset and to be kept burning till it be broad Day Light next morning, and that they give instructions accordingly to such lightkeepers as the lessees shall appoint at their own Risque and for whom they are answerable.”

On This Day in Trinity House History – 3 July

1745

Light Dues are exempted for a good cause

Trinity House Board Minute:

“A letter from Mr. Brooks our Collector for the Isle of Wight was read setting forth that a Master of a ship of 80 tons belonging to Koningsbergh being lately at the Isle of Rhee, met with two English Men, who had been prisoners there and obtained their discharge, but had waited several week for a passage to England, without any opportunity or prospect thereof, whereupon the Master, who was bound home took compassion on their case & tho’ he had no Business in England, yet he was willing to set them ashore on the back of the Isle of Wight, but that he was afraid of being obliged to pay Light Money, Which the poor men (to gain their passage) promised to indemnify him from; That the master not being able to set them ashore on the back of the Isle of Wight, tho’ the wind was then favourable for his return home without touching in England, he came to Cowes on purpose to land them and then pursued his voyage

“That the poor men have borrowed money there to pay the Light Money, but pray it may not be insisted on. The whole of such case being considered and that the charge must fall wholly upon the poort men, The board were of opinion that it ought not to be insisted on.”

 

On This Day in Trinity House History – 15 May

1745

The Naze Tower beacon gets a whitewash

Trinity House Court Minute:

“Mr. Richman at Harwich reporting that he has been out with several bricklayers to whitewash the Beacon at Nazeland, who think it a dangerous job and ask eight pounds to do it. They to find all the materials except four ladders of 24 feet long, which are wanting; and that some of the Gists are decayed: Ordered, that he be directed to contract with the whitewashing in the cheapest manner he can, not exceeding £8 as proposed, and he also provide the ladders as are wanting and repair the Gists which are decayed.”

The present Naze Tower was built in 1720-21 by Trinity House, and was intended to work in conjunction with Walton Hall Tower to guide vessels through the Goldmer Gap. It was of particular benefit to ships using the nearby port of Harwich. Both the current Naze Tower and its predecessor had beacons or lamps lit at the top, providing an early form of lighthouse. Naze Tower was given Grade II* listed status in 1984 by English Heritage.

Naze Tower, Walton-on-the-Naze

Naze Tower, Walton-on-the-Naze

On This Day in Trinity House History – 11 May

1745

The former Trinity House headquarters at Water Lane gets a lick of paint

Trinity House Court Minute:

“Ordered, that the Hall of this House be new painted and whitewashed forthwith, and that the Models, Pictures, and Tables of Benefaction therein be put into proper repair and order.”

 


2011

HRH The Princess Royal is elected Master

At the annual Trinitytide elections, HRH The Princess Royal KG KT GCVO is elected Master of Trinity House in place of the departing Master, HRH The Duke of Edinburgh.

The Princess Royal was sworn in as an Elder Brother of the Corporation in 2004. The Master took pride of place when Trinity House Motor Boat No.1 led the vanguard of the Diamond Jubilee procession upon the Thames in 2012.

Jubilee Procession by Lord Ambrose Greenway

Jubilee Procession by Lord Ambrose Greenway

On This Day in Trinity House History – 26 February

1745

The Elder Brethren order an inspection of the Naze Tower

Trinity House Court Minute:

“Pursuant to the last court of 26 Jan. the board considered of alterations as there proposed of the Beacon at the Naze Land, and a letter was ordered to be sent to Mr. Richman a carpenter (and the Overseer of ye Lights) at Harwich to survey the said Beacon, to send up its dimensions, and to signify if it is in good condition, or ruinous, if ever it was whitened, and of what colour it is now.”

Naze Tower, Walton-on-the-Naze. This distinctive landmark was built in 1721 by Trinity House as a beacon for shipping.

Naze Tower, Walton-on-the-Naze. This distinctive landmark was built in 1721 by Trinity House as a beacon for shipping.

On This Day in Trinity House History – 13 February

1745

The Elder Brethren put in an order for buoy chain

Trinity House Court Minute:

“Notice having been given for proposals to be offered to the board this day for making buoy chains in the following manner:-

That every chain of twelve fathoms long shall not exceed 4ct. 2qrs. 0lbs
That the fidd plate and forelock shall not exceed 56 lbs.
That the shackle shall not exceed 16 lbs.
That there not be less than 42 links in a fathom.
and that there shall be four swivels in a twelve fathom chain,
and all the Iron that shall be made use of be first Ore Grounds Iron, particularly marked (L),
Three tenders received, one at five pence a pound and two at sixpence, and the former was accepted.”

Buoy chain testing on THV Galatea copyright Trinity House

Buoy chain testing on THV Galatea copyright Trinity House