Cinque Ports Pilots – Part II

The final part in a fascinating history of the Cinque Port Pilots, which Trinity House became responsible for in 1854.

The Dover Historian

Duke of Wellington, the champion of the Cinque Ports Pilots. Dover Harbour Board. Duke of Wellington, the champion of the Cinque Ports Pilots. Dover Harbour Board.

On 14 September 1852 the Cinque Ports Pilots champion, the Lord Warden (1829-1852), Duke of Wellington (1769-1852), died –  see Cinque Ports Pilots Part I. The government lost no time, having rationalised pilotage, to do the same with the Admiralty Court. The Lord Wardens Bench, on which for centuries the Lord Wardens had sat while presiding over the Court, stayed in what became old St. James’ Church until World War II (1939-1945). For safekeeping it was moved to St. Marys Church and then to the Museum, where it still be seen.

Although the Cinque Ports Pilots had become part of Trinity House, their licenses covered the area from Dungeness (west of Dover) to London Bridge and vice-versa. Albeit there were other changes, for instance, to become a Trinity House pilot the applicant could be no older than…

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